• Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture

    The 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP 23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held in Bonn, Germany from 6th to 17th November 2017, marked a milestone for negotiations on agriculture by reaching a decision on next steps for agriculture within the UNFCCC framework, the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture. Credit: CIAT The Joint Work decision on Agriculture enables countries and stakeholders to share views on the elements to be included in the work ahead of the next session of subsidiary bodies in April-May 2018. This presents an opportunity for countries and observer organizations to air their views on a number of issues, “starting with but not limited to the following”: Modalities for implementing the outcomes of the in-session workshops organized over the past years. Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience. Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management. Improved nutrient use and manure management towards sustainable and resilient agricultural systems. Improved livestock management systems. Socioeconomic and food security dimensions of climate change in agriculture. Actions on the ground – and learning from them – can inform the discussions that will take place. In order for transformation to occur, agriculture has to be seen in a broad sense to include policies, services and institutions. Public private partnership will be a cornerstone for this transformation, together with efforts to scale up climate financing to the sector, transforming agricultural research for development, and building capacity, including through South-South cooperation mechanisms. The work under the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture is only due for reporting back to COP26 in November 2020. Read more

    Continue reading
  • Climate-Smart Agriculture Mainstreaming in Development Project

    Agriculture is an essential pillar of The United Republic of Tanzania’s economy, and a key driver of rural development. In fact, the sector employs about 78 percent of the population; it contributes to approximately 95 percent of the national food requirements; it provides livelihood to more than 70 percent of the population; and it accounts for about half of the gross domestic product and export earnings. However, the majority of households still produce at subsistence level, and agriculture is mainly rain fed, hence more susceptible to climate change impacts. Specifically, the United Republic of Tanzania is already experiencing the adverse impacts of climate change, which is suppressing and distorting the country’s efforts to improve productivity of the agriculture sector as a whole, and having long-term implications if no adaptation measures are put in place. In response to climate change challenges on food and nutrition security, the United Republic of Tanzania has been undertaking various efforts at the national level, including the development of the National Adaptation Programme of Action (2007), the National Climate Change Strategy (2012), the Agriculture Climate Resilience Plan (2014–2019), and the National Climate-Smart Agriculture Programme (2015–2025), together with the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (2015) submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The recently launched Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) guideline was framed according to these existing documents, reiterating the government’s commitment to make the agricultural sector climate-smart by 2030. Hence the CSA guideline is an instructive tool that highlights key climate change and agricultural risks in the United Republic of Tanzania and provides information on mainstreaming climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives within rural development. More particularly, it provides guidance on how this could best be achieved through the implementation of the CSA approach, in line with other policies related to agriculture sectors, food and nutrition security, and climate change. Framed in community-based and gender-sensitive approaches, it will help harmonise and bridge the services and knowledge provided by different stakeholders and support the governments’ efforts to facilitate the implementation and scaling up of CSA, and hence the actions related to agriculture sectors in the NDC of the United Republic of Tanzania. Its goal is thus primarily to inform on the implementation of the CSA framework and to describe the CSA practices and technologies best suited for different regions and agro– climatic zones of the country. Hence, operationalization of the CSA guideline is an important step towards achieving the global and national goals of sustainable agriculture production in a changing climate in the United Republic of Tanzania.

    Continue reading
  • Challenges on Implementation of Climate Change Policy in Tanzania

    An Info Note which assess how and to extent climate change issues have been mainstreamed into Tanzania’s national policy and strategic documents with the title “Barriers to successful climate change policy implementation in Tanzania” highlight challenges for inadequate implementation of climate change policies in the country. The info note broadly acknowledge the Tanzania government efforts towards addressing the adverse impacts of climate change at the international, national and local levels. Efforts at the national level include the development of effective strategic and institutional frameworks such as the National Climate Change Strategy of 2012 and Zanzibar Climate Change Strategy of 2014 that are crucial for the enhancement of the country’s climate change adaptation and mitigation agenda. The two climate change strategies aim to, among other objectives, build capacity to climate change; enhance institutional and coordination arrangements to adequately address climate change; enhance participation in climate change mitigation activities; and mobilize financial support to tackle climate change. In the Agriculture sector, strategic policy documents such as National Agriculture Policy (2013), the Agriculture Climate Resilience Plan (2014), the National Climate Smart Agriculture Programme (2015), the National Climate Smart Agriculture Guideline (2017) and National Climate Smart Agriculture Country Profile (2017) have also been developed for the same cause. However, lack of an effective national finance mechanism to direct climate funds slows down implementation of climate change policies. This is claimed to be influence by the absence of comprehensive financing plan in the policy documents that highlights an expected source for funding for budgeted costs to execute implementation of its climate change agenda. Poor coordination of climate change actions from the national level to the local level is another highlighted challenge; poor coordination among stakeholders hinders effective implementation of climate change actions as stipulated in the policy documents. With considerably low adaptation responses to climate change issues among stakeholders, owing to limited climate change knowledge across levels, effective implementation of climate change policies requires an enhancement of country-level institutional capacities to strengthen the process to tackle climate change issues. To address challenges of poor coordination and limited climate change knowledge in the agriculture sector. The Tanzania Climate-Smart Agriculture Alliance (TCSAA) represents a promising opportunity for improved coordination, dialogue, and information sharing on Climate-Smart Agriculture related issues across levels in the country as recommended in the Tanzania Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profile.  

    Continue reading
  • Utabiri wa Mvua za Msimu, Novemba mpaka Aprili 2018

    Taarifa hii kama ilivyotelewa na Mamlaka ya Hali ya Hewa Tanzania inatoa uchambuzi wa mifumo ya hali ya hewa na mwelekeo wa mvua za Msimu katika maeneo yanayopata msimu mmoja wa mvua kwa mwaka katika kanda ya magharibi, kati, nyanda za juu kusini magharibi, maeneo ya kusini, ukanda wa Pwani ya kusini pamoja na maeneo ya kusini mwa mkoa wa Morogoro. Kutokana na mifumo ya hali ya hewa inayotarajiwa, mvua za wastani hadi juu ya wastani zinatarajiwa katika maeneo mengi yanayopata msimu mmoja wa mvua kwa mwaka. Hata hivyo, vipindi vya mvua kubwa vinatarajiwa katika kipindi cha mwezi Januari 2018. Mvua hizi zinatarajiwa kuanza wiki ya kwanza ya mwezi Novemba na kuisha wiki ya nne ya mwezi Aprili 2018. Mvua zinatarajiwa kuwa za wastani hadi juu ya wastani katika maeneo mengi ya mkoa wa Dodoma, Singida, Kigoma, Tabora, Rukwa, Katavi, Mbeya, Songwe, Njombe, Iringa, Ruvuma, Lindi na Mtwara na kusini mwa mkoa wa Morogoro. Katika maeneo ya mkoa wa Kigoma, Tabora, Rukwa, Katavi, Mbeya, Songwe, Njombe, Iringa, Lindi, Mtwara na kusini mwa mkoa wa Morogoro mvua zinatarajiwa kuanza wiki ya kwanza ya mwezi Novemba, 2017 na kusambaa katika mikoa ya Dodoma na Singida katika wiki ya kwanza ya mwezi Desemba, 2017. Mtawanyiko hafifu wa mvua unatarajiwa katika maeneo ya Mikoa ya Lindi na Mtwara katika kipindi cha Januari hadi Februari, 2018 kipindi ambacho ukanda wa mvua unatarajiwa kuwa nje ya eneo la kusini mwa Tanzania. Mvua zinatarajiwa kuisha katika wiki ya mwisho ya mwezi Aprili, 2018 katika maeneo mengi yanayopata msimu mmoja wa mvua. Athari za matukio ya vipindi vifupi vya mvua kubwa yanatarajiwa kusababisha mafuriko katika maeneo machache. Milipuko ya magonjwa inaweza kujitokeza kutokana na uhaba wa maji safi na salama na uwepo wa mfumo hafifu ya maji taka hususani katika mij. Katika sekta ya Kilimo, hali ya unyevunyevu kwa ajili ya mazao na malisho ya mifugo na Wanyamapori inatarajiwa kuwa ya kuridhisha. Aidha, wazalishaji wa samaki wanashauriwa kutumia mbinu za kitaalamu katika ufugaji endelevu wa samaki. Wakulima na wafugaji. Endelea kusoma taarifa zaidi hapa. wanashauriwa kuvuna maji kipindi cha mvua kwa matumizi ya baadae.

    Continue reading
  • Msimu Rains Outlook over Unimodal Areas for November to April 2018

    Based on climate outlook for msimu rains (November, 2017 – April, 2018) released by Tanzania Meteorological Agency (TMA) on 17th October, the existed and expected climate systems indicated an elevated chance of normal to above normal rains over most parts of unimodal areas of Tanzania. However, occasional heavy rains are also expected over these areas especially towards the month of January 2018. The rainfall season was expected to start between the month of November and December 2017. Msimu rains are specific for the Western, Central, South-western highlands, Southern regions and Southern coast. These regions experience unimodal rainfall pattern, which starts in November and ends between April and May of the following year. Rains over these areas are expected to be normal to above normal over most areas. Rains are likely to be mainly normal to above normal over most parts of Dodoma, Singida, Kigoma, Tabora, Rukwa, Katavi, Mbeya, Songwe, Njombe, Iringa, Ruvuma, southern sector of Morogoro, Lindi and Mtwara regions. In regions of Kigoma, Tabora, Rukwa, Katavi, Mbeya, Songwe, Njombe, Iringa, Lindi, Mtwara and southern sector of Morogoro regions rains are expected to start in the first week of November, while over Dodoma and Singida regions rains are expected to start in December, 2017. The South-eastern parts of the unimodal areas (Mtwara and Lindi regions) are likely to experience poor rainfall distribution during the months of January and February, 2018 when the rainfall making mechanism is expected to be further South of the country. Rains are expected to cease during the fourth week of April 2018 over much of the unimodal areas. Expected impacts include incidences of short periods of heavy rainfall that may lead into floods and associated impacts to societies over few areas. There is a likelihood of outbreak of water borne diseases especially in areas with poor sewage systems over urban areas and in areas with shortage of safe water. In the agriculture sector, soil moisture levels for crops production as well as pasture production for livestock and wildlife is expected to improve. Fish farmers are advised to practice aquaculture and practice sustainable fishing. Both farmers and livestock keepers are advised to harvest rainwater for immediate and future use. You can also download the seasonal weather outlook report here.

    Continue reading